Socrates in the Labyrinth

Internal Copies

ELL-W-79-2

Like New Condition

Copy published by Eastgate Systems, Inc. on CD-ROM in 1994. Currently in The Dene Grigar Collection.

ISBN: 1-884511-17-1

Grigar purchased this copy from Eastgate Systems, Inc. for use in the lab. The CD-ROM works with Mac and Windows. This is one of a handful of early pre-web hypertexts that takes the form of a creative essay and the only one produced in the area of philosophy. The folio contains a manual and CD-ROM. It is creased on the top right hand side.

Tested and working on the following operating systems:

ELL-W-79-1

Acceptable Condition

Copy published by Eastgate Systems, Inc. on 3.5in Floppy Disk in 1994. Currently in The David Kolb Collection.

ISBN: 1-884511-17-1

Grigar received this copy from David Kolb for use in the electronic literature lab in 2017. The CD-ROM works with Windows. This is one of a handful of early pre-web hypertexts that takes the form of a creative essay and the only one produced in the area of philosophy. The folio contains a manual, a Storyspace manual for Windows, a Storyspace floppy disk for Windows (beta), and a black Windows floppy disk. Copy in pristine condition. Black floppy disk is empty.

Tested and working on the following operating systems:

Requires the following software:

  • StorySpace or StorySpace Demonstration

      Related Works

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      The Dene Grigar Collection

      I Have Said Nothing

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      We Descend, Volume One

      The Dene Grigar Collection

      Author(s)

      David Kolb

      First Published

      1994

      Original Publisher

      Eastgate Systems, Inc.

      Language

      English

      Description

      "'Socrates in the Labyrinth' is a wide-ranging exploration of the relationships between hypertext, thought, and argument. Does hypertext present alternatives to the logical structures of if-then, claim and support? Is hypertext a mere expository tool, that cannot alter the essence of discussion and proof? Or is hypertext essentially unsuited to rigorous argument?"--Eastgate Systems, Inc.

      External References

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