Krista K

Run Lola Run

 

The movie “Run Lola Run” has many recognizable aesthetics. The first one is Lola’s vibrant colored hair. In some of the scenes, the director shot overhead angles of her running through the streets. By doing this, it kept the attention on her. No matter the angle, the audience was able to easily find her. Interestingly enough, red is known as the color of extremes and is often associated with “love, seduction, violence, danger, anger, and adventure” (Beyer, 2017).  Since the movie revolves around the emotion of her trying to save her boyfriend’s life, it only makes sense that they would use this particular color for Lola’s hair. The movie contains many dull colors except for the phone booth that Manni is in and Lola’s hair (Beyer, 2017).  Both colors, red and yellow, are primary complementary colors that stand out against dull colors (Beyer, 2017). The audience is able to keep their focus directed towards the main characters without becoming distracted by the landscapes (Beyer, 2017).

What makes this movie stand out amongst other Classical Hollywood styles is how it’s able to successfully change between a cartoon and actual people.  In some situations, this type of technique is difficult to achieve and still maintain a captive audience.  For example, when Lola runs out of her room, she leaves the scene as an actual person, however, when we see her next, she is a cartoon. As we’ve learned in class, screen cues are extremely important. Each time he did this, he used transition scenes to switch her between the two realities. The first and last time was with her opening the door at the bottom of the stairs and the second time was when she tumbled down the stairs.

After learning in class, the previous week about time manipulation, I thought this particular movie was a great example of it.  Throughout the entire movie, we are re-watching the same scene over a period of three times with slight changes in each.  Tom Tywer was able to achieve this by using timely cues. For example, when Manni throws the red bag into the air and as it begins to come back down, we are given the scene of the red phone coming down as well.  As both of them come back down to the ground, we land on the scene with the phone falling back onto the hook and Lola running out the door. The only way we are able to tell that this is a different scene is because of the cartoon. The way Lola is able to get down the stairs changes each time.  Every time it changes back to the beginning, we are given the scene of the phone falling onto the hook. The movie is able to maintain time manipulation without losing the audience through subtle changes throughout each scene.

 

 

 

Citations:

Beyer, Natalie. (2017, January 19th). “Run Lola Run: Still Analysis Through Color Theory.” Medium.com. Retrieved:  https://medium.com/cinema-studies/run-lola-run-still-analysis-through-color-theory-6b9da54e5fe7

 

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Time Frames-Blog

Digital cinema holds many opportunities for time manipulation. However, it’s a different process than comic books. With comic books, we’re able to visually see the progression of the panels leading us through the narrative.  Our eyes follow the direction of the panels, which makes us feel like we’re actually living the story. Digital cinema, on the other hand, leads their audience subconsciously through the movie.  Both mediums are visual, but comics are able to control the pacing. The artwork and layout are extremely visually appealing that the creator is able to draw out the story, whereas you can’t in digital cinema. With digital cinema, there are three ways to control time.  They are slow motion, fast motion, and time lapse. Slow motion occurs when the director records a scene at a faster pace, which allows them to edit it back to a normal speed. In doing this, it creates the appearance that the subject is moving slower than usual. With fast motion, it’s the opposite. They film it in slow motion, which then allows them bring it to normal speed through editing. Take the Flash series for example.  Directors were able to manipulate time and motion in order to make it appear as though Berry Allen has super speed.  Time lapse, on the other hand, is a little different. This particular process is when you take a sequence of photos and record them at a slower rate without any movement. It’s like watching a flower open when the sun comes out and then closes up when it becomes dark out.  Another example of time manipulation would be using simple objects such as a clock, calendar, or even time stamps. It’s similar to what we were trying to achieve in class with demonstrating a late student. We showed an image of the clock, people paying attention to the professor and someone running down the hall. Through those scenes the audience was able to have a sense that the student was late to class. These are all things that allows for digital cinema to manipulate time.

 

 

Citations:
Katsis, Brian. (2016, July). “The Use of Time  Manipulation in Films.” Borr’es Productions. Retrieved from: http://borresproductions.com/2016/07/the-use-of-time-manipulation-in-films/

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Continuity

 

For the continuity assignment, I was able to enlist my roommate’s help with this project. I decided to focus my assignment on cooking eggs.  Since we were shooting indoors, I had the opportunity to borrow my friend’s lighting equipment to set up in our kitchen.  The light equipment made a remarkable difference in comparison to simply using the house lighting. The house lighting contained a yellow tint, which made the video quality go down.  However, after setting up the equipment, it created a more balanced setting between the yellow and the white lights.  One of the key components I learned through this process was the importance of proper lighting.  Different shades of white light create different effects, which can dramatically alter the desired result of the video.  When shooting, you want clear crisp footage, that doesn’t make your audience have to second guess what they’re watching.

Before shooting, I sat down and wrote out the type of sequences I wanted and discussed it with my roommate.   She would be performing in the video and would need a clear understanding of events.  When I was brainstorming ideas, I knew that I wanted a mixture of both close ups and medium close up in regards to cracking the eggs. I used my experience in watching cooking shows to help my thinking process.  Many times, shows focus more on the ingredients and the mixing process, which is made up of several shots, including close ups and wide angles.  This is to show the audience what each step is supposed to look like. Cooking shows are a great example of manipulating time.  Generally, those types of shows are no more than an hour, which means they have to manipulate time to display the end result.

I think what makes this a visual story is the way it’s been sequenced and edited.  For example, consider the bowl moving.  In order for it to make sense that we’ve moved to a different part of the kitchen, you have to show the bowl leaving one scene and reappearing in another. When I first recorded the video, I realized that I forgot to shoot that scene, but I didn’t think it held that much importance to the film as a whole.  However, after attempting to edit it without that scene, I came to the conclusion that it actually does make a big difference. Without that shot, my audience would have been left confused.  The film would have been made up of a series of cuts that wouldn’t have made sense.   As directors, we sometimes forget that you have to show the “extra” scenes in order for them to make sense. We can’t assume that everyone else will know what we’re thinking.  It’s not until the editing process, that we realize each scene is just as equally important to the entire sequence.  My film is made up of a mixture of both close-up, wide, and medium close-up angles.  Each one scene is able to tell a complete visual story.

 

This article has 1 Comment

  1. Krista,
    This editing has a good pace and narrates the cooking of eggs. However, most of these cuts are discontinuous. There is a visible temporal and spatial gap between each shot. Continuity is usually an illusion where the gaps becomes invisible to the eye.

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Screen Grabs

Each scene in the movie is its own narrative. Simply by the angle of the shot, the audience has an understanding on the importance of each scene. Often times, the producer chooses this type of angle or shot to draw the audience’s attention towards something specific or to just keep them interested. If a movie was made up of the same shots in every scene, there would be no visual stimulation.  They wouldn’t be watching a movie anymore, but instead, a slide show. People want to be able to watch a movie that keeps them continually interested in till the end. The reason behind having shots such as long, medium, and close is because each angle is able to control a specific part of the movie. The long angle is to show the subject from a distance, which emphasizes the place and location (Dise, 2017).  The close shots demonstrate the details of the subject and even highlight the facial emotions of the character (Dise, 2017). Lastly, the medium shot, is placed in the middle, emphasizing on the subject and also still showing the environment around it (Dise, 2017).

For my project, I chose the iconic movie “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off.”  The sequence I selected from the movie is when Ferris and his friends are in the art gallery. In this scene, they spend their time looking at priceless pieces of artwork. One section, in particular, is when Cameron is looking at the famous “A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte” by Georges Seurat. While Cameron is looking at the painting, the camera slowly inched closer and pans between the little girl in the painting and him. The directors were paralleling the painting as he was staring in the girls face. This was a technique that caught my attention most. It made the audience believe that they were watching Cameron interact with the little girl from the painting. Even though as the camera zoomed in closer, you could still see the emotions that both the painting and Cameron held.

 

 

Citations:

Dise, Justin. (2017). “Filmmaking 101: Camera Shot Types.” B&H video.com. Retrieved from: https://www.bhphotovideo.com/explora/video/tips-and-solutions/filmmaking-101-camera-shot-types

 

 

 

 

(wide, low, extreme long)

(wide)

 

(full body, medium long, & medium)

 

(full body)

 

(full body)

(medium close)

 

(close up)

(rule of thirds)

 

(close up)

 

(medium close)

 

(extreme close up)

 

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Blog Post #1

I believe that because we have the resources and technology at our finger tips, now, more than ever, it opens up a wide range of opportunities to create films.  Most of the time, people believed that you had to have the proper equipment in order to produce an audience appealing film.  However, cell phones have changed this thinking.  Automatism of digital video today is now cell phones.  Phones now have higher quality in resolution, photos, and videos.  We now have the ability to pull out our phones and record footage and call it “a film” or “a movie.” Instead of watching someone else create films for others to enjoy, we have become the creators with limitless possibilities.  We share our excitement, adventures, and “wonder” with others, therefore creating the human connection through our experiences. In this week’s readings, the article discussed how the producer of “High Flying Bird,” Steven Soderbergh, produced his film using an iPhone.  From an outside perspective, had the viewer known that this movie was shot using an iPhone, the audience would never have guessed.  The article even stated that “High Flying Bird” is probably the least iPhone-looking iPhone film yet” (Lindbergh, 2019).  If this is the case, then this means it’s merely the beginning for future films to be produced like this.  Granted, I’m not saying that films such as the “Avengers” could be produced using an iPhone, but I do believe that short documentaries or even movies such as “High Flying Bird” could be created with these tools.  The benefit to using technology such as iPhones is that it enables the director to have more accessible mobility. For example, consider the type of equipment one might use to produce an actual movie in comparison to simply using a mobile device.  With a mobile device, you now have the ability to move about a stage easier and quicker.  In the article, they even remarked how Soderbergh had stated that “both the speed of the iPhone and its ability to move around the room and get in inaccessible spaces” (Lindbergh, 2019).  The reason these types of films are being produced is because there’s no longer limits to people’s creativity.

 

Citations:

Lindbergh, Ben. (2019, February 7th.) “The Rise of the iPhone Auteur.” The RINGER. TheRINGER.com.  Retrieved from: https://www.theringer.com/movies/2019/2/7/18214924/steven-soderbergh-high-flying-bird-iphone-tangerine-unsane-netflix

 

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About

Hello! My name is Krista and I’m a DTC major with a Fine Arts minor. I am excited for this course because I have very little experience in video and its always been something that has peaked my interest.  What interests me the most is the process. Pulling together different angles and shots and from that, being able to create a video that tells a story. This is one of the reasons why I really enjoy the video on the Ember Goods coffee shop. The video is able to guide the viewer through the shop and give them a almost realistic feeling of actually being there in person. I believe this is the kind of style that interests me most and I would really enjoy learning more about it.

 

 

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