Jasmine Lunceford

Time – Run Lola Run

The cinema narrative techniques used in Run Lola Run are mostly that of the narrative structure. The way that the film portrays time, breaks each scenario into a beginning, middle and end. If the film were to be structured in a different way it would change the entire meaning and narrative tone of the film changing how we see each character. Choosing to put the bed scenes in the middle rather than the end allows the viewer to interpret more information and ideas about the film. Choosing not to have anything after the last sequence could leave it open to the viewer to decide if that was reality or yet another scenario. In my opinion, this is similar to the ending of Inception.

The beginning of each sequence the film breaks apart the digital aesthetic by altering the traditional hierarchy of film. The 2D animation of Lola running down the stairs changes the perspective and reality of each sequence. I think that the scream she has as well plays with this idea. Almost as if those are elements to alter the reality of the film showing you that it is not really happening, but this can be argued. The continuity of each sequence reminds me of traditional Hollywood by creating a sense of time, urgency, and emotion through framing alone rather than dialogue. The speed she is running in comparison to the train in the last sequence feels more realistic than in the two previous. We are now seeing her in comparison to larger things that surround her making the last sequence feel like the final real scenario. The constant showing of the clock allows for a reference and the repeating of certain shots shows us the continuity of the narrative getting her from point A to point B. Without the urgency in her running and the clock, I think that the narrative would not have been as strong. Without much context of the characters at the beginning the narrative relies heavily on the actions and space to create a connection through time.

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Piece of Mind

For my continuity video I chose to use a friend to convey a moment of “Piece of Mind”. I wanted to have something that was simple but allowed for me to capture my subject in a realistic way. For the video I had the subject coming home and taking a moment to relax and play some music, going from a quicker pace down to something calmer or more mellow. Walking up the stairs, down the hall and through the apartment were less personal so I used wider shots to establish the feel and emotion of the subject. When it came time to actually play the ukulele the shots were much closer and slower paced in comparison to walking. The shot from behind at the end was quite, as if whatever issue he was trying to get his mind off of was now behind him. 

I think from the filming aspect of this assignment it was harder to get the continuity without maintaining consistent framing. There were moments when the framing came naturally for the shots that I wanted, such as the long hallway and the close up of the feet passing. Though it was trying to frame and maintain continuity with an instrument that was a little harder than I anticipated. I think there were many shots that worked well in the video, though I do believe for the amount of time allowed for the assignment it did not blend as well as I hoped. There are a large amount of shots with excellent framing that had to be cut to maintain time and continuity. 

I think the shots later from outside were harder to do in such a small amount of space. I think the framing of the close up on the ukulele could have been done differently to get the desired shot. Utilizing wider shots could have also played with the time as well as a feel for the surroundings to frame the scenes. I wanted the feeling to go from hectic and stressed to leaving feeling just a little better. Though the scenes leading up to actually playing the instrument took up the majority of the time and had more of the continuity. 

From this assignment I have learned the importance of not only framing for continuity purposes but also for spacial purposes. With limited space things become tricky and continuity becomes increasingly important for each shot. I have also learned that continuity also extends to sounds in each frame. Cutting larger actions like the walking seemed to come easier with a variety of shots while subtle movement or smaller details did not blend well for continuity purposes. 

To tell a visual story there needs to be a good amount of planning and various amounts of shots in order to do continuity editing. I think though it is possible there is a skill behind getting shots that flow smoothly with varying framing techniques is a skill. Having a draft for even a simple video like with would allow for better framing. Also being aware of space, sound and lighting can have a big impact on whatever you are shooting. Without a plan or a rough idea of what is wanting to be done the story could easily fall through the cracks for a project like this. 

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McCloud – Time Frames

When initially looking over McCloud’s points on time in framing, I thought of the Comet with Justin Long and Emmy Rossum. The film plays off the idea of Slaughterhouse Five, that time can be seen all at once rather than in a straight line of past, present or future. This is just like a comic where everything is laid out in front of us to start or end where we want. Film shows you how, when, and what it wants you to see in order to convey a story, naturally guiding through each shot. Intimate moments in tighter frames often feel shorter than wide shots with groups of people. Though film has a way of playing with perception that would not agree with McCloud’s explanation. Utilizing motion to show time along with framing can take a five minute scene and transform it into a month long journey. In film story tellers can use wide shots to show everything happening around to help portray the passage of time in a moment even with lighting and sound. Even space between two characters can alter the emotion or passage of time in a moment by making it seem larger and longer than the brief clip being shown in a film. Unlike a comic the more detail a film has in each shot the more the perception of time can be altered for a viewer.

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Continuity Framing – Comet (2014)

Medium Close-up

Medium Close-up, low

Close-up

Medium Close-up

Medium Close-up, over the shoulder two shot

Close-up, telephoto/zoom, 3/4 back

Medium Close-up, High

Medium Close-up, two shot

Medium Close-up, over the shoulder two shot

Long Shot, High, birds eye

Medium Close-up, over the shoulder two shot

Medium Close-up, two shot

 

Unfortunately, being a IFC film made in 2014, The Comet is very limited on which clips you can grab. This film plays with the idea of how we view time and space while analyzing the relationship of two characters in a parallel universe.

In this scene Dell (Justin Long) is trying to gain the trust of his ex girlfriend Kimberly (Emmy Rossum) to move to a different train car. Without much more context the use of medium close ups and close up shots implies a more intimate scene between the two people. The close up shot of Dells hand is focusing on his openness and showing her that he can be trusted. When she stands up after taking his hand the over the shoulder shot of her behind him show her hesitation. Putting her in the background allows for the feeling of hesitation, distance, or something standing in the way. It isn’t till a few shots later that the camera flips the prospective allowing her to be guided by him down the train cart. The birds eye between the two carts gives the idea that even though there is danger around them in the bigger perspective they are together and the trust or relationship between them is stable enough to overcome it. It is not until they have overcome the cross between train carts that you see the two of them from the same perceptive as equal parts facing each other. Not one individual is blocking, leading, or above the other. The moving between the two cars can symbolize where they were in there relationship and what was need to gain trust in order to get to a better place between them, or overcome what was broken.

I think that this type of close shooting and only using the two characters to create distance or space between each other is a creative way to explain the hesitation trusting someone you had a close relationship with.

It is a very different type of movie, full clip below.

 

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Blog #1

With phones constantly advancing and pushing boundaries it was only a matter of time before they were used to tell a new story. Rather than trying to be like traditional film, phones are rewriting what we know and are familiar with when it comes to film making. As discussed in the readings using iPhone to create movies has allowed for directors and visionaries to capture angles and shots that previously would not be possible. It allows for actors to shoot a scene completely in character rather than taking the time to break and reset lights. Utilizing an iPhone has allowed for films to capture moments that would otherwise be time consuming and expensive to create.

 

I think the automatism of today would be everything we are doing with our phones. It has become so natural for us to watch everyone’s life through a lens that it is now normal to live our lives through constant moving images. We are consumers through commercials and now video ads on our social media. This has become a normalized version of how we view the world, how we workout, entertain ourselves and connect. Similarly, “Night Fishing” showed movement of walking with the shaking of the camera that allowed for a realistic feel of walking through the woods or watching one of our social media friends out on a hike. I think with filming on phones becoming so highly normalized it has lead videos from a form of expressive art to a more “natural” and relatable version of storytelling. In the clip from “Unsane” the low lighting made for a more realistic, grainy feeling to the protagonists experience and emotion. Since we are always advancing from black and white to camcorders to iPhone, it is not about the tools that you use to create a film or video. It is about how you use the tools you have to creatively represent content that creates a connection.

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Hello Everyone!

My name is Jasmine and I am a senior in the DTC program. I have always had a love for movies and cinematography. In the last film class I found interest in post production, directing and screenwriting. Here is a little short:

I like the idea of showing rather than telling in video, this video is a good example of that. There is just the right amount of detail not to overwhelm but enough to keep interest. It has context and is relatable to a wide range of people.

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