bstorozhko19

bstorozhko19

The New Arrival (Continuity Assignment)

This semester I’ve started keeping my tripod in my car in case I ever spontaneously found inspiration or an idea for filming something.  While visiting my parents this weekend I saw an opportunity for making a continuity video of a new chicken arriving and being added to a flock. My parents live in a somewhat rural area and they enjoy raising and keeping chickens in their backyard. They frequently buy new chickens to add to their coop or give them to relatives and friends who also keep chickens.

One of the things I learned from making this video is that I need to keep the terrain in mind. I didn’t fully take into account the terrain before filming. My parent’s property is on a hill and the land is sloping downward. Thus, for many of the shots, I had to try and hold the tripod in order to prevent it from falling over.  This created some shots that could’ve significantly contributed to the story but were unusable due to excessive shakiness of the camera. For example, I filmed an extreme long shot that I wanted to put in the beginning to establish the environment and setting. However, the camera was positioned on a steep slope, so the shot ended up shaky and distracting.

Another thing that I need to keep in mind when filming future videos is the maximum time limit. I abided to the 60 seconds time limit for this film. Nonetheless, there were some other shots that I wanted to include but they would’ve chewed up too much clock, even with editing. This is because the editing for the continuity video needed to be precise. I found that when I cut out even a few extra frames from a shot, the transition between shots would look discontinuous.

The framing of the film was okay though I do think it is an area I can improve upon. There was a variety of camera positions in my film as it included long, medium-long, and medium close-up shots. However, I could’ve filmed with a larger variety of camera positions and possibly included some angled shots too. In addition, I could’ve been more stringent in adhering to the rule of thirds. Some of my shots follow the rule of thirds, though if more shots adhered it would’ve helped guide the viewer’s eyes to the points of interest.

I believe I did a decent job of establishing continuity for my video. Before filming, I planned out and considered the sequencing and ordering of the shots. I think this helped prevent the video from seeming too fragmentary and disjointed. An example of this continuity is the three shots, starting with my dad getting out of the SUV, then picking up the chicken cage, and walking to the chicken coop. These shots were filmed at different locations and times, but the planning of camera location and editing made that part of the video look continuous. In addition, I utilized the empty frames rule to cover the distance between the car and the chicken coop to make it seem that some time had passed.

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Blog 3 – Time Frames

McCloud starts off his visual essay “Time Frames” by pointing out that it’s a common misconception to think that each comic panel is a single point in time with moments in between the panels that create the sense of time and motion.  McCloud explains that comics are unique in that they integrate the space of the panel and the motion within the panel to manipulate the reader’s sense of time. McCloud’s findings on the basis of time manipulation in comics led me on an attempt to think deeper about some of the ways that time is integrated and manipulated in digital cinema.

I think a large factor and way of manipulating the perception of time in digital cinema is through editing. Shots are captured in real-time when filming with a camera and editing is a method to work around this. For instance, various shots can be cut and inserted into scenes during the editing phase to either expand or shrink the perception of time. Inserting shots in to make time seem faster is particularly prevalent for a vast majority of films since most of them take place over a longer period than the 1 to 2 hours that the viewer watches it for. Furthermore, each shot can also be sped up or slowed down with editing software to further manipulate the passage of time

An additional method for manipulating time in digital cinema can be done via the content in the film. This is not necessarily unique to digital cinema since it can be done with comics too. On page 99 of his visual essay, McCloud writes that “the durations of that time and dimensions of that space are defined more by the contents of the panel than by the panel itself.” This can also be true for digital cinema. Visual content that indicates a modified passage of time can be put into focus or placed in the background of a shot. An example of this is a shot with a clock or calendar that displays a time or date that’s significantly different than was displayed in a previous shot. The use of shots that provide visual clues such as older or newer looking background content is also frequently used to inform the viewer of a significant change in time (i.e. decades into the past or future).

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Blog Post 2 – Mr Robot Scene

 

Screenshots from Mr. Robot to show the different shots in the scene

 

 

 

 

Medium Close-Up (MCU)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Close-Up (MCU)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Long Shot (MLS)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Close-Up (MCU)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Long Shot (MLS)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium (M)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Close-Up (MCU)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Close-Up (MCU)

 

 

 

 

 

Over the Shoulder and Medium Long Shot (OTS + MLS)

 

 

 

 

 

Over the Shoulder and Medium Long Shot (OTS + MLS)

 

 

 

 

 

Over the Shoulder and Medium Long Shot (OTS + MLS)

 

 

 

 

 

Over the Shoulder and Medium Long Shot (OTS + MLS)

 

 

 

 

 

Over the Shoulder and Medium Long Shot (OTS + MLS)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Close-Up (MCU)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Long Shot (MLS)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Long Shot (MLS)

 

 

 

 

 

Long Shot (LS)

 

 

 

 

 

Over the Shoulder and Medium (OTS + M)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium (M)

 

 

 

 

 

Over the Shoulder and Medium Close-Up (OTS + MCU)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Close-Up (MCU)

 

 

 

 

 

Over the Shoulder and Medium Close-Up (OTS + MCU)

 

 

 

 

 

Over the Shoulder and Medium Close-Up (OTS + MCU)

 

 

 

 

 

Over the Shoulder and Medium Long Shot (OTS + MLS)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium (M)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Close-Up (MCU)

 

One of my favorite scenes of all time was the ending of the Mr. Robot episode “h4ndshake”. The scene starts with a discussion between the primary character Elliot and his therapist Krista about the connection between Elliot and Mr. Robot. Krista then reveals to Elliot that his recollection of memories and events from the past few months were false and never actually took place. All of Elliot’s earlier scenes in the season were constructed by his mind as this was essentially his bypass method of getting around the bleak reality that he has been living in prison the whole time.

I believe the mixture of excellent cinematography along with a mind-blowing plot point made this scene particularly memorable and notable. I was particularly impressed with the use of tilting, panning, and editing. The ending shots panned and tilted between Elliot’s fake and real versions of events. Along with the tilting and panning was the careful editing which made the transition between the two entirely different environment’s look continuous and very natural. This effectively helped further strengthen the narrative of reality versus illusion by creating an identical point of view for both perspectives.  I also noticed that there were a lot of over the shoulder shots in the scene. I think that these shots worked really well because they helped place the viewer in Elliot’s shoes as he moved between real and illusory versions of events. In addition, most of the shots in the scene were either medium or closer. Thus helping reinforce the sense of an especially up-close and personal immersion into Elliot’s life.

 

 

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Blog Post 1

I believe the iPhone movies Detour and Night Fishing are filmed and based on the unique qualities of the iPhone. There are present-day smartphone specific features that needed to be accounted for in the filming of these movies. One of the qualities of the iPhone is its portability. It is very small and light, as a result, this allowed for more freedom in its placement and movement. Another quality is the iPhone’s low cost, this freed up more money towards other production expenses in the movies. Additionally, smartphone lenses are generally smaller than the larger cameras. This can work well in certain circumstances, especially if the filmmaker is looking to provide a realistic or authentic point of view.

There are examples of iPhone specific qualities being utilized in Detour. For instance, there are 2 shots when the family was in the car. One of the shots was filmed from the perspective of the mother and the succeeding shot filmed in the perspective of the daughter. Through the iPhone’s smaller lens size and placement, the audience’s point of view is different than traditional film. The perspective feels very realistic and natural for that specific scene when compared to traditional cameras. Whereas Night Fishing was filmed with an attached 35 mm lens (Lindbergh) so it bared more resemblance towards traditional cinema.

Display of car scene from "Detour"

I think one of the more clear-cut automatisms of digital video in the present is freedom of movement. These devices are far more portable than bulky traditional cameras. This grants numerous benefits for creators such as capturing a lengthier scene with a single shot or filming scenes that involve extensive movement. As a creator and consumer, this allows for a lot of flexibility when it comes to usage and production. In my case, I typically use and create digital videos for entertainment and knowledge. I think as digital video devices continue to evolve in quality, accessibility, and portability, their usage will become universal as there will be very little if any limitations as to what they can be used for. This will create exciting new storytelling opportunities due in large part to the expanding and subsequently diversified filmmaker and consumer base.

 

Works Cited

Lindbergh, Ben. “Steven Soderbergh’s ‘High Flying Bird’ and the Rise of iPhone Films.” The Ringer, 7 Feb. 2019, https://www.theringer.com/movies/2019/2/7/18214924/steven-soderbergh-high-flying-bird-iphone-tangerine-unsane-netflix

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Hello class

Hello, my name is Bogdan. I transferred from Clark College last spring into the DTC program. I’m somewhat addicted to streaming video platforms such as Netflix/Prime Video/YouTube. So I’m particularly interested in learning more about the techniques behind the production of video content so that I can apply them towards creating my own videos.

I would like to pursue slow-motion and/or time-lapse in some of my videos. Vox’s videos are really well done in my opinion. I chose this specific video because I think the showcased slow-motion and time-lapse sequences of the wildlife are visually fascinating. I think the hyper-lapse sequence in the city is especially visually stunning in particular. In addition, I like that this video is not only entertaining but also educational.

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