bstorozhko19

bstorozhko19

Hyper Cinema – Blog Post

Seances is a very interesting experimental film project. I think it’s very idiosyncratic as it allows each viewer to play a direct role in choosing their own uniquely generated film that can only be viewed once. The interaction in Seances only commences at the start when viewers choose which assembled film to view. The story of each film is one of a kind since the algorithm generates scenes created from a unique sequence of compounded media elements. This experimental form of storytelling often creates a highly abstract story due to the vast number of directions that each film can take.

Seances interface is straightforward, it prompts the user to choose which film they want to view. This initial interaction between the viewer and the project is significantly important though as it will determine the entire experience for the viewer. However, the interface contains an option to start over if a user wants to view something different. Thus, users aren’t stuck with any single film, they can explore endlessly until they find something that catches and holds their interest. In my opinion, Seances does frequently create narratives though it largely depends on the film that was generated For some films, the narratives created can seem fragmented, disjointed, or even nonsensical at times. For others, the narratives are intriguing and thought-provoking. The films produced by the algorithm are cinematic because each film consists of edited footage with additional media elements like sound and images. Such media elements, along with other fundamental cinematic techniques such as framing and continuity, help to portray and reinforce the thoughts and gestures that are being shown to the audience.

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Video Essay – Blog Post

I think the use of language with images is a very powerful tool for filmmakers. The end product from this combination is much more interesting and thought-provoking than it would be with just the use of language or images alone.  Images are a universal language, people from around the world all understand what is being shown. However, the addition of words and language essentially enhances what is being shown by providing additional context and key information.

It’s important that voice-over, text, sound, graphics, and video are combined in a way that grabs and maintains the viewer’s interest. Due to the immense number of videos on platforms such as YouTube, Vimeo, etc., viewers want to be sure that what they’re watching is worth their time. For video essays, these elements (video, sound, etc.) should also be interwoven in a way where they can reflect off each other. If a certain image is shown for instance, then the sound and words should reflect and reinforce what the image is showing.

I would begin “writing” a video essay by first choosing a topic or subject that I like. This is very important because the quality of my work is significantly higher if I’m interested and engaged throughout the creation process. If I decide to use an argument, I would think of how to establish and demonstrate it to the viewer. This could include incorporating a specific focal point or maybe adding certain components that can be used to fortify the argument. Lastly, I would create a script and start filming.

 

Final Project Idea:

Also, describe your final project idea. Please address the following questions:

  • In two or three sentences, what is your subject, idea or story? 

For my final project, I want to create a mind-bending video with a dream feel. I still haven’t fully decided on the subject but I know it will be a fiction video.

  • What form will it take? (YouTube series, 2-3 minute video, interactive video)

It will be in the form of a 2 to 3-minute video.

  • Which two class modules are you exploring in this project?

I will explore the pixel and montage modules for this project.

  • What will you need in the coming weeks to shoot/capture video? (actors, locations, permissions)

I will need to search for some locations to film at and some actors.

 

 

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SKAM Blog Post

I think the recent convergence of webisodes and social media is very interesting. While I’m not really a fan of the teen drama genre that SKAM abides by, I do like the idea behind webisodes that involve social media interaction in general.  I like that the scenes in SKAM are posted as their own “mini-episodes”. Compared to traditional series, the reduced length of time for each webisode post is perfect because the audience is viewing it on social media platforms. A lot of social media users use these platforms for short chunks of time throughout the day. Thus, the short length of each webisode post matches the length of time that audience members allot for social media. In addition, I like webisodes that help make the viewer think that they’re watching a live stream. Even though SKAM is like a reality show in that it’s scripted, there’s a much more realistic sense that the events shown are actually happening. That, coupled with the interaction between the audience and the characters of the series, further adds to the perception of reality.

An idea I have for a networked interactive series would be based around social media influencers and their lives. It would be like SKAM in that most parts are filmed and edited shortly before airing on social media. However, there would be parts where the influencer interacts with the audience on social media and those parts would be live. This would reinforce and make it seem as if the whole episode is truly happening in real-time. One of the greatest advantages of doing a show about social media is the engagement that it encourages from the audience. Viewers would have an incentive to interact with the influencer through social media for a chance to be included in the show and noticed by an influencer. This would not only benefit the show and the audience but also incentivize the starring influencers to gain further recognition and new followers.

 

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playdamage.org screenshot

Pixel Cinema Blog Post

The work that I find most intriguing and aesthetically appealing is the hybrid art found on the website playdamage.org.  The website consists of over 100 pages, each one with a uniquely different amalgamation of looping gifs and images. With each click of the computer mouse, the viewer is transported to an entirely different page.   The strong contrast between the movement patterns, colors, sounds and shapes of each page provides intense and almost dizzying stimulation to the eyes and ears. Most of the GIF’s are in the “glitch” style, which contributes towards a feeling of extreme volatility. It provides a sensation of being suddenly immersed into a digital dimension and space, one that does not follow the rules of our physical world as we know it. Unlike traditional cinema, it seems as if the creator(s) of playdamage.org are purposely showing that the created space is unlike our existing reality.  Thus, there are no attempts to hide this from the viewer.

In traditional cinema, visual realism is given a very high priority. In “What is Digital Cinema” Manovich writes, “Cinema’s public image stressed the aura of reality “captured” on film, thus implying that cinema was about photographing what existed before the camera, rather than “creating the ‘never-was’” of special effects.” In contrast, digital cinema has made it possible to ease the previously stringent reliance on live-action footage to provide realism in a film. This is because the pixels that digital videos subsist on can easily be modified and changed in the editing process thereby allowing for a more expanded “elastic reality”. Thus, space is no longer limited in digital cinema and the possibilities are infinite. This increased sense of freedom has inspired me and opened many interesting possibilities and ideas for making my own “pixel” cinema video.

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Eagle Creek Fire Blog Post

If I had to create a documentary about the Eagle Creek fire, I would pursue a story on the recovery status of the forest. It’s been over 2 years since the fire started so I think the present is a great time to show the viewers if there’s any progress on the regrowth of the forest and revival of animals in the area. It would be a good opportunity because some people may not know about the current situation in the area since media coverage of the fire has decreased from its peak in 2017.

I would most likely interview professionals that have knowledge about and directly facilitated the post-fire recovery process. This would most likely include scientists (botanists, biologists, etc.) employed with the U.S Forest Service that play a direct role in the recovery of the forest. I might ask them some questions about what they do for their job and how it ties in with the rehabilitation of the forest. However, most of the questions would be about the forest itself because my focal point for the documentary is the current status of the forest’s recovery.

Since a documentary is a work of nonfiction, I would seek out visual evidence that factually tells the story of the recovery process and status. Thus, I would not include b-roll cover footage that merely fills in time or portrays something without providing indisputable visual evidence of things that are discussed in the interview. Since my documentary is about recovery, some shots that I might seek out are new trees being planted by the interviewee or partially burnt ones starting to turn green again. However, I would also ask, look, and check for any areas of the forest that are still badly burnt as these shots would provide evidence of slower recovery.  If there are areas that are quickly recovering and others that are slowly recovering, then I would include shots of each. Another piece of visual evidence that I would look out for is of any native wildlife that originally fled the fire but have since returned to the area.

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Montage Blog (The Godfather)

The Baptism Murders scene in The Godfather is a remarkable montage in which the juxtaposed shots convey a lot of information in a very short amount of time.  The scene uses parallel editing to show Michael Corleone being baptized in a church, while the men that work for him are assassinating the heads of the 5 families. The shots are interwoven together to indicate that both scenes are taking place simultaneously.

For this scene, I have ruled out it from being a metric montage as the shots do not abide by a specific set length of time. I also don’t think it’s a rhythmic montage, the scene does have visual continuity, it doesn’t seem to be the dominant element though. This essentially rules out overtonal montage. Furthermore, the scene doesn’t seem to be an intellectual montage because it doesn’t include meaningful shots that are unrelated to the film.

I think the scene is a great example of Einstein’s tonal montage. Editing decisions seemed to be made with the main intention of attaching deep emotional meaning to the shots. An example is how brief the killing shots were. Usually killing shots are far longer in length. This seems to have been done on purpose to provide the viewer with a state of shock due to the indifference that the main character’s men had while killing the family heads. I also think the ordering of the shots was intentional to draw further emotion. The shots jumped back and forth between the church and the killings. Thus, I think the parallel editing of the scene further solidifies the montage as being tonal.

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Run Lola Run

I really enjoyed watching Run Lola Run. The story reminded me of the Netflix series Russian Doll. In both shows, the main characters die, but they receive multiple opportunities to restart the day and change their actions in order to circumvent their impending doom.

The cinematography for Run Lola Run seemed very creative and unique. The movie frequently used continuity techniques such as match on action, motivated POV, graphic match, and parallel action. An example of this is the motivated POV used to show the inside of the phone booth from Lola’s perspective.

The unique aspect of this movie is that the narrative is continuous, but it also incorporated elements that were discontinuous. For instance, the repeated use of still shots and rapid jumps and cuts made it seem quite discontinuous at times. However, I think the partial discontinuity is a part of what made the movie seem interesting and unique. The dynamic cuts and jumps contributed towards a sense of tension and desperation.  Whereas the still shots contributed towards the story by providing flashbacks into the past for different characters.

Even though the movie contains frequent jump cuts and still shots, a sense of order is still maintained. This is because the movie is guided towards a specific end goal and destination through continuity. In addition, powerful visual reminders are repeatedly shown to the viewer to reinforce the sense of time and urgency. For example, the countdown towards the 12 pm deadline is consistently brought to the viewer’s attention by using frequent shots of watches and clocks.

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The New Arrival (Continuity Assignment)

This semester I’ve started keeping my tripod in my car in case I ever spontaneously found inspiration or an idea for filming something.  While visiting my parents this weekend I saw an opportunity for making a continuity video of a new chicken arriving and being added to a flock. My parents live in a somewhat rural area and they enjoy raising and keeping chickens in their backyard. They frequently buy new chickens to add to their coop or give them to relatives and friends who also keep chickens.

One of the things I learned from making this video is that I need to keep the terrain in mind. I didn’t fully take into account the terrain before filming. My parent’s property is on a hill and the land is sloping downward. Thus, for many of the shots, I had to try and hold the tripod in order to prevent it from falling over.  This created some shots that could’ve significantly contributed to the story but were unusable due to excessive shakiness of the camera. For example, I filmed an extreme long shot that I wanted to put in the beginning to establish the environment and setting. However, the camera was positioned on a steep slope, so the shot ended up shaky and distracting.

Another thing that I need to keep in mind when filming future videos is the maximum time limit. I abided to the 60 seconds time limit for this film. Nonetheless, there were some other shots that I wanted to include but they would’ve chewed up too much clock, even with editing. This is because the editing for the continuity video needed to be precise. I found that when I cut out even a few extra frames from a shot, the transition between shots would look discontinuous.

The framing of the film was okay though I do think it is an area I can improve upon. There was a variety of camera positions in my film as it included long, medium-long, and medium close-up shots. However, I could’ve filmed with a larger variety of camera positions and possibly included some angled shots too. In addition, I could’ve been more stringent in adhering to the rule of thirds. Some of my shots follow the rule of thirds, though if more shots adhered it would’ve helped guide the viewer’s eyes to the points of interest.

I believe I did a decent job of establishing continuity for my video. Before filming, I planned out and considered the sequencing and ordering of the shots. I think this helped prevent the video from seeming too fragmentary and disjointed. An example of this continuity is the three shots, starting with my dad getting out of the SUV, then picking up the chicken cage, and walking to the chicken coop. These shots were filmed at different locations and times, but the planning of camera location and editing made that part of the video look continuous. In addition, I utilized the empty frames rule to cover the distance between the car and the chicken coop to make it seem that some time had passed.

This article has 1 Comment

  1. Good. In general, varying distance – long, medium, close helps with continuity editing. For example when the car leaves frame-left and appears frame- right there isn’t much change in angle or distance. The cut from long to medium of petting the chicken works pretty well.

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Blog 3 – Time Frames

McCloud starts off his visual essay “Time Frames” by pointing out that it’s a common misconception to think that each comic panel is a single point in time with moments in between the panels that create the sense of time and motion.  McCloud explains that comics are unique in that they integrate the space of the panel and the motion within the panel to manipulate the reader’s sense of time. McCloud’s findings on the basis of time manipulation in comics led me on an attempt to think deeper about some of the ways that time is integrated and manipulated in digital cinema.

I think a large factor and way of manipulating the perception of time in digital cinema is through editing. Shots are captured in real-time when filming with a camera and editing is a method to work around this. For instance, various shots can be cut and inserted into scenes during the editing phase to either expand or shrink the perception of time. Inserting shots in to make time seem faster is particularly prevalent for a vast majority of films since most of them take place over a longer period than the 1 to 2 hours that the viewer watches it for. Furthermore, each shot can also be sped up or slowed down with editing software to further manipulate the passage of time

An additional method for manipulating time in digital cinema can be done via the content in the film. This is not necessarily unique to digital cinema since it can be done with comics too. On page 99 of his visual essay, McCloud writes that “the durations of that time and dimensions of that space are defined more by the contents of the panel than by the panel itself.” This can also be true for digital cinema. Visual content that indicates a modified passage of time can be put into focus or placed in the background of a shot. An example of this is a shot with a clock or calendar that displays a time or date that’s significantly different than was displayed in a previous shot. The use of shots that provide visual clues such as older or newer looking background content is also frequently used to inform the viewer of a significant change in time (i.e. decades into the past or future).

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Blog Post 2 – Mr Robot Scene

 

Screenshots from Mr. Robot to show the different shots in the scene

 

 

 

 

Medium Close-Up (MCU)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Close-Up (MCU)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Long Shot (MLS)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Close-Up (MCU)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Long Shot (MLS)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium (M)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Close-Up (MCU)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Close-Up (MCU)

 

 

 

 

 

Over the Shoulder and Medium Long Shot (OTS + MLS)

 

 

 

 

 

Over the Shoulder and Medium Long Shot (OTS + MLS)

 

 

 

 

 

Over the Shoulder and Medium Long Shot (OTS + MLS)

 

 

 

 

 

Over the Shoulder and Medium Long Shot (OTS + MLS)

 

 

 

 

 

Over the Shoulder and Medium Long Shot (OTS + MLS)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Close-Up (MCU)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Long Shot (MLS)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Long Shot (MLS)

 

 

 

 

 

Long Shot (LS)

 

 

 

 

 

Over the Shoulder and Medium (OTS + M)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium (M)

 

 

 

 

 

Over the Shoulder and Medium Close-Up (OTS + MCU)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Close-Up (MCU)

 

 

 

 

 

Over the Shoulder and Medium Close-Up (OTS + MCU)

 

 

 

 

 

Over the Shoulder and Medium Close-Up (OTS + MCU)

 

 

 

 

 

Over the Shoulder and Medium Long Shot (OTS + MLS)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium (M)

 

 

 

 

 

Medium Close-Up (MCU)

 

One of my favorite scenes of all time was the ending of the Mr. Robot episode “h4ndshake”. The scene starts with a discussion between the primary character Elliot and his therapist Krista about the connection between Elliot and Mr. Robot. Krista then reveals to Elliot that his recollection of memories and events from the past few months were false and never actually took place. All of Elliot’s earlier scenes in the season were constructed by his mind as this was essentially his bypass method of getting around the bleak reality that he has been living in prison the whole time.

I believe the mixture of excellent cinematography along with a mind-blowing plot point made this scene particularly memorable and notable. I was particularly impressed with the use of tilting, panning, and editing. The ending shots panned and tilted between Elliot’s fake and real versions of events. Along with the tilting and panning was the careful editing which made the transition between the two entirely different environment’s look continuous and very natural. This effectively helped further strengthen the narrative of reality versus illusion by creating an identical point of view for both perspectives.  I also noticed that there were a lot of over the shoulder shots in the scene. I think that these shots worked really well because they helped place the viewer in Elliot’s shoes as he moved between real and illusory versions of events. In addition, most of the shots in the scene were either medium or closer. Thus helping reinforce the sense of an especially up-close and personal immersion into Elliot’s life.

 

 

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Blog Post 1

I believe the iPhone movies Detour and Night Fishing are filmed and based on the unique qualities of the iPhone. There are present-day smartphone specific features that needed to be accounted for in the filming of these movies. One of the qualities of the iPhone is its portability. It is very small and light, as a result, this allowed for more freedom in its placement and movement. Another quality is the iPhone’s low cost, this freed up more money towards other production expenses in the movies. Additionally, smartphone lenses are generally smaller than the larger cameras. This can work well in certain circumstances, especially if the filmmaker is looking to provide a realistic or authentic point of view.

There are examples of iPhone specific qualities being utilized in Detour. For instance, there are 2 shots when the family was in the car. One of the shots was filmed from the perspective of the mother and the succeeding shot filmed in the perspective of the daughter. Through the iPhone’s smaller lens size and placement, the audience’s point of view is different than traditional film. The perspective feels very realistic and natural for that specific scene when compared to traditional cameras. Whereas Night Fishing was filmed with an attached 35 mm lens (Lindbergh) so it bared more resemblance towards traditional cinema.

Display of car scene from "Detour"

I think one of the more clear-cut automatisms of digital video in the present is freedom of movement. These devices are far more portable than bulky traditional cameras. This grants numerous benefits for creators such as capturing a lengthier scene with a single shot or filming scenes that involve extensive movement. As a creator and consumer, this allows for a lot of flexibility when it comes to usage and production. In my case, I typically use and create digital videos for entertainment and knowledge. I think as digital video devices continue to evolve in quality, accessibility, and portability, their usage will become universal as there will be very little if any limitations as to what they can be used for. This will create exciting new storytelling opportunities due in large part to the expanding and subsequently diversified filmmaker and consumer base.

 

Works Cited

Lindbergh, Ben. “Steven Soderbergh’s ‘High Flying Bird’ and the Rise of iPhone Films.” The Ringer, 7 Feb. 2019, https://www.theringer.com/movies/2019/2/7/18214924/steven-soderbergh-high-flying-bird-iphone-tangerine-unsane-netflix

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Hello class

Hello, my name is Bogdan. I transferred from Clark College last spring into the DTC program. I’m somewhat addicted to streaming video platforms such as Netflix/Prime Video/YouTube. So I’m particularly interested in learning more about the techniques behind the production of video content so that I can apply them towards creating my own videos.

I would like to pursue slow-motion and/or time-lapse in some of my videos. Vox’s videos are really well done in my opinion. I chose this specific video because I think the showcased slow-motion and time-lapse sequences of the wildlife are visually fascinating. I think the hyper-lapse sequence in the city is especially visually stunning in particular. In addition, I like that this video is not only entertaining but also educational.

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