Framing – The Vase

So recently my roommate got a cat named Theo. Which has been great. He’s adorable, full of energy and pretty much everything you’d want out of a kitten. But Theo has one problem: he and the vase of flowers don’t get along. At all. There was a week where we found the vase on the floor every morning. So I decided to capture him in the act. But more seriously,…

September 4, 2018
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Framing for visual evidence

This is my video for this week’s “Framing for visual evidence” assignment. I used various types of frames to show the aftermath of someone using the last of the milk and leaving the empty jug in the refrigerator. The first shot is meant to show someone sneaking away after placing the empty jug of milk in the fridge. I then showed the evidence of who did it by showing the…

September 4, 2018
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Framing Assignment

This was inspired by a short photo series I did for a Digital Storytelling assignment. It is the aftermath of a couple beers and a couple more bad decisions.

September 3, 2018
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Framing – Fight Club

September 2, 2018

This scene is a great way to showcase how you can use framing to help strengthen aspects of character relationships even in a very standard convention like shot reverse-shot. If you want to watch the scene for yourself, you can do so on YouTube.

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Taylor Jones – Who Dunnit

For my “Who Dunnit” video, I filmed a scene at my house. Without giving too much away, I used my framing choices to answer the questions “where?” and, in the end, “why?” but first I make the viewer question “what happened?”

September 1, 2018
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Framing for Visual Evidence

I wanted to create a narrative that expresses a person running and hiding. I thought using the close up of the book would introduce the theme of the short. When the doorbell rings the action is taken away to the door. I wanted to create suspense with the slow movement and kettle boiling. I used L and J cut transitions for a seamless flow with audio guiding the way. When…

September 1, 2018
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Framing – Drive (2011)

A scene that I believe to be a great example of versatile framing is the opening scene from Nicolas Winding Refn’s “Drive.”   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZHYaj6EHfJg   Wide Angle Canted/Dutch Extreme Close-up Low Angle Long Shot Medium shot   While this is a relatively long scene at 12 minutes, all of these shots do a great job at maintaining tension throughout while also following the traditional structure of an introduction, a climax,…

August 29, 2018
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Framing – The Grand Budapest Hotel

August 29, 2018

The Grand Budapest Hotel “The Police Are Here” Long Shot.  An employee (back left) arrives and says “Excuse me?” to the hotel concierge, Gustave (right). The space between the characters in the foreground and background amplifies a long pause before Gustave says, “uh huh?”   Long shot. Cut to the next shot in which the employee says “the police are here.” The abrupt cut and simultaneous zoom into the employee…

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Sequence and Framing

I chose a sequence from one of my favorite movies Crown Heights (2017). I feel as if this film demonstrated excellent storytelling in the shots and tone. MCU – medium close-up (from chest/shoulders up) MLS – medium long shot (from knees up) possibly M – medium (from the waist up) MCU – medium close-up (from chest/shoulders up) High close up (if that is a thing) CU – close-up (face)   MCU – medium close-up…

August 29, 2018
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Framing

January 27, 2014

Framing (camera position) Variety of camera positions and angles keeps the eyes busy and interested, evokes the space and psychology of characters. Maintaining a single angle or distance reinforces a point of view. types of camera positions: ELS – extreme long shot (landscape) LS – long shot (full body) MLS – medium long shot (from knees up) M – medium (from waist up) MCU – medium close-up (from chest/shoulders up) CU – close-up (face) ECU –…

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